Archive for October, 2013

Unusual Ergonomics- A Look at Some Odd Shaped Chairs

If you have ever stepped into an office or place of business that values just where its employees sit, you probably did a few double takes about just what constitutes a chair these days. Ergonomic chair shapes have never been confused for the common and ordinary. Many are designed to look a little weird so that your back doesn’t feel awkward or strange. Here are just a few of the most unusual shapes that you might find in these ergonomically designed forms of seating.

 

The Original Evolution Exercise Ball Chair

The Original Evolution Exercise Ball Chair

 

 

The Ball Chair

 

When most people think of an ergonomic chair shape, they might picture various backrest heights and wave-like seating. However, there are even more unique-looking options, such as the ball chair, popular in newer workspaces and on the startup scene. The idea behind such a sitting implement is to lend the user better balance and posture, along with improved core strength. As there is no backrest on a ball chair, the user has to stay balanced. The result is decreased back pain compared to other places to sit around the office. The ball chair looks very much like an exercise ball. In fact, some models permit you to remove the ball from the wheelbase and use it for exercises.

 

RFM Verte - Executive Ergonomic Chair with Black Frame

RFM Verte – Executive Ergonomic Chair with Black Frame

 

The Pseudo Spine Chair

 

In terms of strange-looking seating, chairs designed with a pseudo spine tend to take the cake. These spine replicas could be mistaken for an insect’s exoskeleton. They are designed to replicate and cradle the spine and the back. The user can customize the pressure and support by adjusting the “ribs” of the chair. The main reason that a company might shell out for such an odd-looking chair is for its proven assistance with chronic back pain. For example, the RFM Verte Executive Ergonomic Chair, designed with a pseudo spine, has been known to help back pain sufferers. This form of seating looks strange with its spine replicator, wide lower portion of the backrest and narrower upper half. However, it gets the job done, even if the user looks like some sort of exoskeleton-possessing insect in it.

 

Ergocentric geoCentric Extra High-Back Synchro Ergonomic Office Chair

Ergocentric geoCentric Extra High-Back Synchro Ergonomic Office Chair

 

The Extra-High Back Chair

 

Some ergonomically designed chairs look like they could touch the moon with their extra-high backs. The extra-high back chair is one of the more unusual-looking types of ergonomic seating. Generally, the shape features a wing curvature of the back to allow for maximum comfort. That wing is also extremely high. You might not see your employees working at their desks; the back is just that tall. Generally, this type of seating is recommend for taller people or those with neck pain. One example of this odd-looking seat is the Ergocentric Geocentric Extra High-Back Synchro Ergonomic Office Chair.

 

Office Star - Ergonomic Kneeling Chair with Wood Frame Finish and Memory Foam

Office Star – Ergonomic Kneeling Chair with Wood Frame Finish and Memory Foam

 

The Kneeling Chair

 

When you think of ergonomically designed seating, you probably envision crazy backs and strange seats. However, some chairs don’t even look like chairs at all. Ergonomically designed kneeling chairs help put the back in a more natural position. While you might require a manual on how to actually sit down in these devices, the kneeling option is not supposed to look like a traditional form of sitting. Generally, people use this type of seating for shorter periods of time to lend temporary relief to the back.

 

Shopping for an ergonomically designed form of seating can take some getting used to for businesses and corporations. If you are obsessed with pretty pieces of furniture, such a look will be a shock to the system. From chairs designed to look like the spine of a human to bouncy balls for sitting, there are a fair number of shapes and forms to this health-conscious mode of design.

 

Getting Healthy in the Workplace

Getting Healthy in the Workplace

If you are overweight or obese, it is important to get healthy quickly. In workplaces across the United States, many billions of dollars are lost every year in revenue as workplaces need to compensate for sick leave.

While accidents do happen, many illnesses are easily avoidable. Especially when it comes to some musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis or RSI, they can arise through constant, daily discomfort in the workplace in a bad sitting position.

 

Getting the Right Seat

It is every worker’s responsibility to make sure that the seat they are working in is comfortable for their needs. While you will almost certainly start your workplace with a computer, a chair, a table and some other furniture, you should set up and customize your workspace so that it is comfortable for you.

Bad posture can also lead to problems with health in the workplace and if sitting in bad posture for years, various injuries can come up. Carpal tunnel syndrome can be caused by excessive or unsafe use of a computer. The constant clicking action of fingers, wrists and typing can cause a nerve in the arm to begin swelling and causing pain.

Carpal tunnel can be very debilitating and painful, and is one of the chief causes of injuries and accidents in the workplace.

 

Sitting at the Right Distance and Angle

Setting up your seat so that you are at the right angle and distance from your monitor is also important. You need to be about 25” away (about an arm’s length or more) from your screen. This is also important for optical health. Every few minutes, look away from your monitor and fix your gaze on something else in the room or outside. This helps to flush the tear ducts in your eyes and readjust your vision.

The keyboard and mouse should be on the same flat surface. Your hands should be at 90 degrees to the table and be resting on the desk or on a keyboard rest. Feet should be flat on the floor to facilitate correct blood flow to every part of the body.

 

Coping with Seated Work

In some situations, you have no choice but to do seated work in an office for many hours at a time. This is where some coping strategies can come into place. These will allow you to preserve your health longer as well.

1) Every half an hour at least, you should take a short walk somewhere in the building. The bathroom, the kitchen, a vending machine, a brief walk outside. Some employers may not allow this too frequently so find out what is acceptable.

2) Ask your manager for a shared couch or resting area near a workplace. Workers can take short breaks there to read or they can have quiet discussions.

3) Stand up and walk around the room a few times every hour to move the blood a bit where it is needed.

 

 

Health Disasters You Can Avert through Proper Ergonomics

 Health Disasters You Can Avert through Proper Ergonomics

Home office and workplace ergonomics are incredibly important considerations. While it might not seem like improper posture or sitting the wrong way in front of your computer could damage your health, the fact is that you can suffer some serious injuries over time, as noted by the University of Connecticut. What conditions might you suffer if you don’t practice good posture and ergonomics? Here’s a closer look.

 

Ergonomic and Posture-Related Health Disorders

All ergonomic and posture-related health disorders are technically musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). MSDs fall into a broad range of categories and conditions. Depending on the length of time you spend sitting, and just how poor your posture or position is, you might find yourself afflicted by any of the following:

 

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – A condition in which the tendons running through the arms, wrists and hands are inflamed, making most common hand and wrist movements painful
  • Tendinitis – A condition in which tendons become inflamed; it generally afflicts the arms and elbows, but can be present in other parts of the body as well
  • Bursitis – Swelling and inflammation of the fluid-filled sacs between joints, tendons and muscles. It can afflict virtually any area of the body
  • Thoracic Outlet Syndrome – This condition includes a weakened grip, pain in the neck, and often tingling or numbness in the fingers
  • Chronic pain in the neck, upper back, lower back, shoulders and arms

 

Each of these conditions can cause serious discomfort and pain, and they can lead to significant time lost from work as well as medical expenses. In severe cases, some may require surgery to correct. For instance, severe carpal tunnel syndrome cannot be alleviated by using wrist braces alone, but may require surgical intervention to eliminate the problem.

 

How Do You Avoid These Conditions?

Obviously, avoiding and minimizing the conditions listed above is in the best interests of both the employee and the employer. Thankfully, it’s not that difficult to get around those problems. All it really requires is following the right ergonomic practices within the workplace.

Good workplace ergonomics can vary from one position to another, most of the time workers will need the right office chair, the right desk and the right computer setup to provide good posture and eliminate strain on muscles, joints and tendons. An ergonomic office chair should offer:

 

 

Proper ergonomics in the workplace can improve the health of workers, save money on medical bills, and reduce lost time and productivity for the employer.

 

Sources:

http://www.oehc.uchc.edu/ergo_officeergo2.asp