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Key Concepts in Workplace Ergonomics

Ergonomics – it’s become an immensely important consideration for both individuals and employers. Even UCLA has started offering ergonomics guides and information for students, teachers and others. Whether you’re an office worker or an employer, it’s important that you understand the key concepts in workplace ergonomics in order to prevent injury, maximize productivity and reduce ergonomic injury-related lost time from the job.

 

Reducing Strain and Stress on Key Body Parts

The entire point of ergonomics is to position office equipment and to support the body in such a way that it reduces strain on key body parts. These include the following:

  • Eyes
  • Neck
  • Wrists
  • Hands
  • Arms
  • Shoulders
  • Upper and lower back
  • Thighs and legs

 

Key Ergonomic-Related Injuries

33% of all workplace injuries involve musculoskeletal injuries generally caused by poor workplace ergonomics. These injuries cause a significant amount of lost time at work, which impacts both the employer and the employee. Some of the conditions caused by not implementing the correct ergonomic plan can include carpal tunnel, eye strain/headaches, tendinopathy, bursitis and many others.

 

Key Concepts to Understand

There are several different concepts at play in workplace ergonomics, including posture, correct workstation setup and more. These include the following:

  • Neutral Neck Position – Your workstation, desk and office chair should allow you to maintain a neutral neck position. A computer monitor should be at least 20 inches away from your body, and it should be directly in front of and slightly below your eye level.
  • Spine Support – Sitting for long hours puts serious stress on your spine and back/shoulder muscles. To correctly support your spine, you need to sit with your feet flat on the floor, and you should have an office chair that provides good lumbar support (either adjustable or with extra padding in the lumbar region). Armrests should be included with the office chair, and they should be adjustable to eliminate shoulder strain.
  • Arm and Hand Positioning – The position you’re forced to hold your arms and hands in when seated at your computer can put additional strain on your body. When seated and using the keyboard, your elbows should be at 100 to 110 degrees (open). The keyboard should have a negative tilt so you can keep a neutral position in your hands and wrists. Keyboard trays should be wide enough for both the keyboard and the mouse, so you can use them without raising your arm to another position.

 

Breaks, Stretching and Exercising

It might sound counterintuitive, but office workers should engage in regular stretching and exercising while on the job. This helps to eliminate stress and strain, and enhances blood flow, which can increase comfort as well as productivity. Regular breaks are also important to help prevent workplace injuries.

  • For every 20 minutes of typing, you should take a 20-second break
  • For every 20 minutes of typing, you should look away and focus on the middle distance for 20 seconds
  • Every hour, you should get up and walk around the office or take a stroll to the break room
  • Every hour, stretch your legs, arms, shoulders and wrists to enhance blood flow

These tips and key concepts will help enhance workplace productivity, but also reduce the chance of injury for office workers

 

Sources:

http://ergonomics.ucla.edu/

http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/tc/office-ergonomics-topic-overview

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