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ergonomic

  • Keep Your Comfort and Health in Mind When Setting Up Your Office

    ergonomic chairs for back painYour workstation should be designed to keep you comfortable and enable you to perform your work easily and comfortably. It's important to take care when designing your workstation, to ensure all the elements are working together to provide you with the utmost level of comfort.

    It's important to make sure that your workstation is designed to avoid any strain, discomfort, or repetitive injuries. One of the most common complaints by office workers is lower back pain. Making sure you are taking care of yourself will ensure that you are healthier and more productive in the long run.

    The most important consideration when putting together your work space is selecting the right chair. It may not seem very important, after all, a chair is a chair, right? Wrong. Cheap office chairs will be of no help to you, and can possibly cause discomfort and injury.

    The best chairs for lower back pain are ergonomic chairs. The benefit of ergonomic chairs for back pain is that they are designed for people who spend long hours sitting, and therefore have all the necessary support and adjustments to keep them comfortable.

    The most important benefit of ergonomic chairs for back pain is the lower back support. The best ergonomic chairs for back pain will have a lumbar support pillow. This pillow cushions the muscles in the lower back, while supporting and cushioning the vertebrae in the lower back, which must support the most of the body's weight.

    However, using ergonomic chairs for back pain will not make any difference if the chairs are not appropriately adjusted. These chairs are designed to be adjusted to suit each individual user. Obviously, no two people are the same, so the only way to design one chair to benefit everyone is to make it adjustable to fit different body dimensions.

    >When getting a new office chair, you should make sure it is adjusted to fit you. The seat height should be adjusted to allow your legs to fit under your desk, with your knees bent at a 90-degree angle. The back rest should be tilted at a slight angle, no more than 30 degrees, so that it can help take some of the weight off of your lower back. Your armrests should allow your arms to rest comfortably without lifting your shoulders.

    Designing your work station may not seem like a very difficult task, but your most important consideration should be arranging it so that you are comfortable and safe. You don't want your long hours of hard work to cause you discomfort, poor health, or injury. Choosing the right chair will be a step in the right direction.

  • An Ergonomic Desk Chair Will Help You if You're Stuck at Your Desk All Day

    ergonomic computer chairs Back pain is one of the most common complaints from office workers, as a result of having to sit at their desks all day, day after day. There are comfortable chairs for back pain, but oftentimes, workers are stuck with cheap office chairs, or the office chairs they do have are not adjusted correctly. There are specific settings and comfortable positions to keep in mind, that might help alleviate any back pain resulting from sitting for long hours.


    The best chairs for lower back pain are ergonomic computer chairs. These chairs are designed to provide the optimum comfort and support, for people exactly in your position: stuck in a chair for long hours. Ergonomic computer chairs are also incredibly comfortably, and will allow you a more enjoyable working experience, in general.

    One very important thing that ergonomic computer chairs provide is lower back support. These chairs contain a lumbar pillow insert that cushions the lower back, stretching and elevating the lumbar muscles, and taking some pressure off of the spine.

    The best computer chairs have many adjustable components, so you can adjust them to suit your particular body. Make sure the height of your chair, your armrests, seat depth, and back incline are all adjusted to suit you. It doesn't matter the quality of the chair you're sitting in, if it's not adjusted for your body, you may actually be harming yourself even more.

    Americans spend billions of dollars treating back pain every year, but what's most important is to nip the back pain in the bud before it starts. If you take the proper precautions, by sitting correctly in the right chair that is adjusted for you, you will go a long way to prevent back problems in the long run. Simply being conscious of the way you are sitting will help you improve.

  • Lower Back Pain? Try These Stretches at Your Desk

    It's the number one complaint from our customers.

    Back pain.

    What many people don't realize is that a lot of the time your office chair is contributing to the back pain, and you should probably look into getting a chair better suited for your needs.

    If you're not on the market for a new office chair, Performance Based Ergonomics has put together a video showcasing a few stretches to relieve some of your lower back pain while at your desk.

    Try some of these stretches out and remember to come back to Sitbetter.com when you're ready to invest on a new chair.

     

     

    Read the entire story here.

     

     

     

  • A Brief Guide to Good Posture in the Workplace

    poor posture

    Posture – it’s one of those things that we’ve all heard about, but a surprising many know little of. However, for all that it can be difficult to define without heading to your nearest dictionary, it’s an incredibly important consideration in the workplace, particularly for office workers. Good posture helps prevent the development of serious musculoskeletal disorders, prevents muscle strain and more. What should you know about correct posture, though? Read on to learn more.

     

    Spine Support

    One of the most important elements of good posture is spine support. When sitting down, your natural inclination is probably to lean forward and rest your weight on the arms of the chair. That’s wrong, and it will lead to serious lower back pain, as well as strain on the muscles and tendons in the arms (especially if you do that while trying to type).

    The right type of spinal support is important. The best option is to invest in a quality office chair with a good back (featuring plenty of lumbar support) that follows the natural curvature of the spine. Make sure your feet sit flat on the floor and don’t hang. You should also have maximum contact between your back and the back of the chair without it affecting your ability to type. If your chair has armrests, they should be positioned so that your arms are even with the top of the desk and there’s no shoulder strain present.

     

    Neck Position

    Even if your chair has a built-in headrest, chances are good it’s not going to be used unless you’re leaning back (you’re inactive). That means it’s important you practice good neck posture. Ideally, your neck will be in a neutral position (not forcing it forward, back or to the side). The computer monitor should be just below eye level, so you can look at it while maintaining the right position. Your monitor should also be at least 20 inches from your face (a maximum of about 36 inches).

    Position everything in your work area so that you can reach it or see it without having to turn your head. This will help you keep your neck in the proper position and avoid straining muscles.

     

    The Importance of a Quality Office Chair

    Part of good posture is having the right support for your body throughout the day. In an office environment, that means having a quality office chair. While good chairs do come with a cost, they’re actually more affordable than what you might think, and they’re certainly cheaper than trying to deal with the consequences of carpal tunnel syndrome or chronic lower back pain. A good chair will help support you throughout the day, and should be a “no-brainer” for any office worker (or office manager buying furniture).

    With the information above, it should be easier to understand good posture and put it into effect in your daily life. Invest in a good office chair and protect yourself from serious musculoskeletal disorders.

     

     

    Sources:

    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ergonomics.html

  • Key Concepts in Workplace Ergonomics

    Ergonomics – it’s become an immensely important consideration for both individuals and employers. Even UCLA has started offering ergonomics guides and information for students, teachers and others. Whether you’re an office worker or an employer, it’s important that you understand the key concepts in workplace ergonomics in order to prevent injury, maximize productivity and reduce ergonomic injury-related lost time from the job.

     

    Reducing Strain and Stress on Key Body Parts

    The entire point of ergonomics is to position office equipment and to support the body in such a way that it reduces strain on key body parts. These include the following:

    • Eyes
    • Neck
    • Wrists
    • Hands
    • Arms
    • Shoulders
    • Upper and lower back
    • Thighs and legs

     

    Key Ergonomic-Related Injuries

    33% of all workplace injuries involve musculoskeletal injuries generally caused by poor workplace ergonomics. These injuries cause a significant amount of lost time at work, which impacts both the employer and the employee. Some of the conditions caused by not implementing the correct ergonomic plan can include carpal tunnel, eye strain/headaches, tendinopathy, bursitis and many others.

     

    Key Concepts to Understand

    There are several different concepts at play in workplace ergonomics, including posture, correct workstation setup and more. These include the following:

    • Neutral Neck Position – Your workstation, desk and office chair should allow you to maintain a neutral neck position. A computer monitor should be at least 20 inches away from your body, and it should be directly in front of and slightly below your eye level.
    • Spine Support – Sitting for long hours puts serious stress on your spine and back/shoulder muscles. To correctly support your spine, you need to sit with your feet flat on the floor, and you should have an office chair that provides good lumbar support (either adjustable or with extra padding in the lumbar region). Armrests should be included with the office chair, and they should be adjustable to eliminate shoulder strain.
    • Arm and Hand Positioning – The position you’re forced to hold your arms and hands in when seated at your computer can put additional strain on your body. When seated and using the keyboard, your elbows should be at 100 to 110 degrees (open). The keyboard should have a negative tilt so you can keep a neutral position in your hands and wrists. Keyboard trays should be wide enough for both the keyboard and the mouse, so you can use them without raising your arm to another position.

     

    Breaks, Stretching and Exercising

    It might sound counterintuitive, but office workers should engage in regular stretching and exercising while on the job. This helps to eliminate stress and strain, and enhances blood flow, which can increase comfort as well as productivity. Regular breaks are also important to help prevent workplace injuries.

    • For every 20 minutes of typing, you should take a 20-second break
    • For every 20 minutes of typing, you should look away and focus on the middle distance for 20 seconds
    • Every hour, you should get up and walk around the office or take a stroll to the break room
    • Every hour, stretch your legs, arms, shoulders and wrists to enhance blood flow

    These tips and key concepts will help enhance workplace productivity, but also reduce the chance of injury for office workers

     

    Sources:

    http://ergonomics.ucla.edu/

    http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/tc/office-ergonomics-topic-overview

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